William Hopkins

William Hopkins, Professor

Director, Global Change Center

 

B.S., Mercer University (1992)
M.S., Auburn University (1997) 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina (2001)

Wildlife Ecotoxicology Lab
Global Change Center

Email: hopkinsw@vt.edu
Office: 444 Latham Hall
Phone: (540) 231-7292


Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation
310 West Campus Drive
Virginia Tech,Cheatham Hall, Room 106 (MC 0321)
Blacksburg, VA 24061

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research focuses on physiological ecology and wildlife ecotoxicology, addressing pressing questions in both basic and applied science. From a basic science perspective, my interests are in the energy costs of various physiological and behavioral processes. From an applied perspective, my goal is to understand how anthropogenic disturbances alter the ability of fish and wildlife to interact appropriately with their environment.

 

Courses Taught:

  • FiW 5334 Vertebrate Physiological Ecology
  • FIW 5004 Global Change Seminar
  • FiW 2314 Wildlife Biology
  • FiW 3954 Tropical Ecology I
  • FiW 3954 Tropical Ecology II

Current Research Projects:

Select Recent Publications:

  • S. E. DuRant, A. W. Carter, R. J. Denver, G. R. Hepp, and W. A. Hopkins. 2014. Are thyroid hormones mediators of incubation temperature-induced phenotypes in birds? Biol Lett 2014 10: 20130950.

  • Hepp, GR, SE DuRant, and WA Hopkins. In press. Influence of incubation temperature on offspring phenotype and fitness in birds.  In: Nests and Eggs: Incubating New Ideas about Avian Reproduction, D.C. Deeming and S.J. Reynolds (eds).  Oxford University Press.

  • Eskew, E.A., B.Todd, W.A.Hopkins.  In press. Extremely low prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in Eastern Hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) in southwest Virginia, USA.  Herpetological Review

  • Moser, W.E., J.T. Briggler, D.J. Richardson, C.D. Schuette, C.I. Hammond, W.A. Hopkins, and E.A. Lazo-Wasem. 2013. Redescription and Molecular Characterization of Placobdella cryptobranchii (Johnson and Klemm, 1977) (Glossiphoniidae: Hirudinida). ZooKeys 338:1-10.

  • Adelman, J.S., A.W. Carter, W.A. Hopkins, and D.M. Hawley. In press. Deposition of pathogenic Mycoplasma gallisepticum onto bird feeders: host pathology is more important than temperature-driven increases in food intake. Biology Letters.

  • Van Dyke, J.U., W.A. Hopkins, and B.P. Jackson. 2013. Influence of relative trophic position and carbon source on selenium bioaccumulation in turtles from a coal fly-ash spill site. Environmental Pollution 182:45-52.

  • Beck, M. L., Hopkins,W.A., and Jackson, B.P 2013. Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Diet of Tree Swallows: Implications for Trace Element Exposure after Habitat Remediation. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. DOI: 10.1007/s00244-013-9913-5

  • DuRant, S.E., W.A. Hopkins, A. F. Wilson*, C. M. Stachowiak*, and G.R. Hepp. In Press. Incubation conditions are more important in determining early thermoregulatory ability than post hatch resource conditions in a precocial bird. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.

  • Carter, A. W., S.E. DuRant, G.R. Hepp, W.A. Hopkins. In press. Thermal challenge severity differentially influences wound healing in wood duck (Aix sponsa) ducklings. Journal of Experimental Zoology: Part A.

  • Hopkins, B.C., Chin, S.Y., Willson, J.D., and Hopkins, W.A 2013. Like mother, like offspring: Maternal and offspring wound healing correlate in snakes. Journal of Experimental Biology 216:2545-2547.

 

Last updated April, 2015